Category Archives: railroad

Pinal Mountain (and summiting Signal Peak) 15APR18

Drove up to Pinal this morning to swap out some equipment. Getting to/from Pinal from the highway isn’t difficult, just 18 miles, with 12 of them on a really great-condition (at least until the rains come) dirt road.

Once I was finished with my other hobby, I started down the road and parked at the Signal Peak turnoff (651B). As I’d never been to Signal, and I’d never used the mobile PeakBagger app to record a hike, I was able to do both and learn a thing or two or three new things.

The first thing I learned was that Signal was less than 300′ minimum prominence, and that’s what I’d set my PeakBagger filter for, so Signal didn’t show up until I dialed that down to 250′.

http://www.peakbagger.com/climber/ascent.aspx?aid=950119

7812′ elevation – clean prominence: 252′ – isolation: 1.1 mi

GPS log available at peakbagger link above.

Time-lapse video of trip from US 60 to Pinal and back

Signal Peak benchmark directly under fire lookout tower.

Looking NW toward fire lookout tower and cabin.

 

Summiting Newman Peak 11MAR18

http://www.peakbagger.com/climber/ascent.aspx?aid=937700

~4500′ elevation – clean prominence: 2500′ – isolation: 24.5 mi

GPS log available at peakbagger link above.

Time-lapse video of drive off pavement

Wireless communications site – off-grid

At the trailhead around 1000. Cloud cover promised a cool day for a hike.

Looking down the main canyon back toward the CAP Tucson extension (the curved line in the middle-foreground). Trailhead is just about where the canal touches the right canyon slope.

Now in the narrow slot that climbs abruptly out of the main canyon.

A handy, helpful bit of guidance for someone who’s vertical-orientation challenged.

Continuing up the slot, view is opening up as clouds break up. Can see at least 100 miles. Rock towers abound.

Atop slot, great views. The hogback-shaped peak in the distance is Table Top, which I’d summited the day before.

While it can’t be seen in this photo, my white truck is naked-eye visible at the trailhead, just to the right of the bridge over the canal.

There really is an end to this climb! Newman radio site in view from below.

Benchmark and peak register.

Again.

That little bump in the center middleground is Picacho Peak. Kinda small from here. Also, the trains were very hearable when they blew their horns.

In far left, Catalina Mountains and Mt Lemmon. In far far center, Baboquivari. A frickin’ gorgeous day for a climb.

More or less east from the site.

Towers.

More towers. And remember to smile, ’cause you’re on camera!

Towers bristling with radomed-microwave dishes.

Another view.

Want to lease space at the site? Call the number.

This power pole is the top end of the line down the side of the mountain. Only single-phase power, anyone know what voltage level?

A shot of the hump at the southernmost part of the main Picacho range, with Picacho Peak in the left background and the freeway easily visible.

Final shot of radio stuff. I promise.

View to the NW, with the Sierra Estrella in the left background, and Camelback even visible (but not in this scaled-down photo).

End of the trip, just on the east side of the CAP Tucson extension. Not a single person seen. Very isolated. Back to vehicle around 1600, and out to pavement and I-10 about 45 minutes later.

And while I’m at it

Last week I had the pleasure to spend in far-south Chicagoland, where it started out 48 °F and raining and ended up 18 °F with black ice everywhere. Not immediately, but once the ice formed, it stayed in place the rest of my visit. Made for some dicey walking.

However, my buddies at the RR, like the post office, work rain or shine, ice or sleet, snow or sand, and were busy installing my hoped-for array of antennas on a homebrew rack up on the roof.

Little hard to see in the photos, but it’s basically a triangular array of 3 tripod mounts held down with a bunch of concrete blocks, then two-sided unistrut forming two vertically spaced equal equilateral triangles, upon which it’s easy to set vertical pipes to attach antennas.

Right now the lab I’m helping to build (in the building below) needs far better cellular connections for the industrial modems that we’re testing, so the antennas on the roof will solve a lot of our mysterious connectivity problems.

The lab also needs a solid GPS antenna on the roof – I have a rack-mounted 8-way GPS splitter inside and I’ll feed one antenna to multiple devices in the lab that need GPS.

The runs from the antennas on the roof to the rack are all 1/2″ superflex, and we’ve got grounded lightning protectors at the rack and shield grounds just before the coaxes penetrate the building. We’re also way lower than many better lightning targets all around us, so we’re probably as safe as we can be.

Next step is to head back there and start assembling some LMR240 jumper cables to run from the rack connections to the final resting places for the signals received.

It’s fun working on the railroad.